Indexed News on:

--the California "Mega-Park" Project

Tracking measurable success on efforts across California to preserve and connect our Parks & Wildlife Corridors



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Wednesday, February 25, 2009

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Up in the "Big Trees" Area of the Sierra Nevada, a Proposal for the Arnold Rim Trail


excerpted from:
http://www.brushwoodinstitute.com/arnoldrimtrail.htm

Arnold is ringed by some truly magnificent public lands—the 8,000 acre Urban Interface (which is Forest Service land), spectacular Big Trees State Park, and the scenic Stanislaus River canyon. There is only one thing standing between an unbroken 30-mile trail encircling the community—a trail that could be accessed easily from each of Arnold’s subdivisions—and that’s Sierra Pacific Industry (SPI) land. On roughly the northeast corner of this currently imaginary loop is SPI’s 3,500-acre holding in the Upper San Antonio Creek watershed. On roughly the southwest corner is a 1,200-acre strip (also owned by SPI) that stretches from the Stanislaus River to the upper portion of the Interface between Love Creek and Moran roads. These currently separate pieces, if connected, would form an Arnold Rim Trail (ART), a breathtaking 20,000-acre community recreation resource to rival anything in the West. In addition to boosting property values and adding immeasurably to the quality of life of residents and second home owners, it would make Arnold (currently perceived as the gateway to the Big Trees, Bear Valley, and the Carson-Iceberg Wilderness) a superb recreation destination in its own right. That’s the vision. And it’s not unrealistic. ...

The 4,700 acres in question comprise three tenths of one percent of SPI’s holdings in California, and about six percent of their 75,000 acres in Calaveras County...


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