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Friday, October 19, 2007

Turner Creek Ranch Project Helps Safeguard the Sierra Valley


725-Acre Working Forest Conservation Easement Nears Completion
http://www.PacificForest.org
Turner Creek Ranch Project

PFT is pleased to announce our latest working forest conservation easement - the Turner Creek Ranch Project - is set to close by year's end.

Turner Creek Ranch is a 725-acre working landscape that supports cattle grazing, hay farming and sustainable timber harvests. The Ranch has been owned by the Turner family for more than 150 years and is currently stewarded by Russell and Elva Turner.

Because of its scenic location in the Sierra Valley near the Feather River, the Turners and other neighboring landowners have been under intense pressure to sell their lands for development. The working forest conservation easement about to be finalized on the property will ensure the Ranch stays in family ownership and remains a productive, working landscape.

Russell and Elva will be generously donating a portion of their easement proceeds in a bargain sale, allowing PFT to secure the easement at a price below market value.

The California Resources Agency has awarded PFT a $4 million Sierra Nevada-Cascade Conservation Grant. The grant will go toward securing a working forest conservation easement on the Ranch that will protect water quality and wildlife habitat. The 725-acre Turner Creek Ranch is located in the southwestern region of Sierra County.

Look for more information about the Turner Creek Ranch Project and our other conservation efforts in the Sierras in the forthcoming issue of our ForestLife newsletter.

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