Indexed News on:

--the California "Mega-Park" Project

Tracking measurable success on efforts across California to preserve and connect our Parks & Wildlife Corridors



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Wednesday, September 5, 2007

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Northern California Wilderness Bill and Riverside County's San Timoteo Canyon Preservation Tops Sunset Magazine Eco-Success List


excerpt from Sunset Magazine


Paradise preserved
The West’s top 10 environmental success stories

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17582684/

3. Northern California Coastal Wild Heritage Wilderness Act: Signed into law last fall, the Northern California Coastal Wild Heritage Wilderness Act set aside 275,000 acres of new wilderness and designated the newest federal Wild and Scenic River — a 21-mile stretch of the Black Butte River in Mendocino County. The new wilderness is not one contiguous swath but adds acreage or protection to various wildlands, like the King Range (north of Fort Bragg) and the Cache Creek area. And it protects everything from amazing wildflower displays to imperiled salmon and steelhead runs. Lands will be managed by the U.S. Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management. Learn more: www.wilderness.net/ or www.wilderness.org/WhereWeWork/California/NCaliforniaWild.cfm


4. San Timoteo Canyon, California: Big tracts of open land aren’t easy to come by in Southern California, much less conserve. But in the case of San Timoteo Canyon, a 174-acre land donation from producer Gale Anne Hurd (The Terminator, Aliens) got the ball rolling. The Riverside Land Conservancy and other organizations have helped acquire an additional 8,000 acres in San Timoteo Canyon and are well on the way toward a goal of 10,000 acres for a future state park (the park is designated, but it’s not yet open to the public). Learn more: www.riversidelandconservancy.org/ or 951/788-0670


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